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The Library at The Dock

Introduction

The Library at The Dock will be a community hub enabling people to come together to create, explore, connect, belong, learn and participate. The Library at The Dock is a tri-partnership between the City of Melbourne, Lend Lease and Places Victoria.

The library will open in May 2014.

This library will offer a collection to suit the needs of the local community, workers and visitors to Docklands.  The layout is reader-centred, making it easier to find your next great read. Non-fiction is arranged in browsable book shop style zones, such as, Business and IT, Arts and Culture and Travel.  For music and film buffs, we have selected a tempting range of classic and contemporary material. The children’s library encourages discovery, through books and interactive technology.

In addition to the traditional library collection, there will be a recording studio, creative editing suites, community spaces and a performance venue to hold up to 120 people. A gallery and exhibition space will celebrate Docklands' rich heritage.   This building continues City of Melbourne’s commitment to sustainability and community-centred public spaces. It will be a world class library and a new civic centre for Victoria Harbour.

Key Features:

  • Interactive, high-digital learning environment
  • Quiet study area
  • Reading lounges
  • Community meeting rooms
  • Heritage exhibitions
  • Technology hub
  • Design inspired by the waterfront location

Learn more!

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Making History – the Docklands Digital Archive

Be a part of history in the making by adding to our memory bank of community stories about living and working in Docklands. 

The varied history of the Docklands area has included wetlands teaming with birdlife, a bustling dock, industrial wasteland and a world-leading technology precinct.  To capture the many facets of Dockland’s heritage, the library team would love to hear about your personal connection to Docklands.

Have you travelled from a faraway land to set up home in Docklands or do you have an interesting story to share about your daily commute to work?  Did you work at Victoria Dock or do you work at Docklands now?  We want to hear from you. 

The Docklands Digital Archive will capture the stories of those living and working in Docklands.  As well as creating a permanent record of Docklands, these stories will be the basis for future exhibitions held in the new Library at the Dock.

To share your story or nominate someone who has a tale to tell, please contact the City of Melbourne’s Community Heritage Curator, Bronwyn Roper, at bronwyn.roper@melbourne.vic.gov.au or call 9658 9322.

 

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Docklands heritage

Docklands has a rich cultural heritage and has played an important role in Melbourne's history. 

Dating back to 8000 BC the area between the Yarra and Maribyrnong Rivers was considered a meeting place and hunting ground for several Aboriginal communities. Tribes such as the Wurundjeri, the Boonerwrung, Taungurong, Djadja Wurrung and the Wathaurong once called Docklands their home.

In the early 1850s, during the gold rush, Victoria Dock (now Victoria Harbour) was created to meet the demands of the accompanying mass migration. In the 1960s huge containers replaced bales and crates formerly used to transport goods. Docklands’ sheds and wharves could not accommodate the containers and soon ceased to be Melbourne’s hub of economic and maritime activity.

Docklands' heritage will be celebrated through exhibitions telling the Docklands story: past, present and future.

Victoria Docks, circa 1925.  Source: State Library of Victoria.

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A sustainable building

The Library at The Dock fulfils a vision for environmental excellence by creating Melbourne’s most sustainable civic landmark.
Setting new environmental standards, the project is aiming for a 6 Star Green Star rating from the Green Building Council of Australia.
To optimise sustainable performance, there will be a range of initiatives including a CLT structure that uses a combination of engineered timber and reclaimed hardwood. 
CLT is a massive wood building material consisting of bonded, cross-laminated single layers. Formaldehyde-free and environmentally friendly adhesives are used for bonding. The cross structure of CLT components guarantees integral stability.

CLT fact sheet


CLT cross-section

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The build

Take a look at the 'live' progress of the build on the WebCam via Victoria Harbour Talks. Or have a look at our images on the Melbourne Library Service Flickr stream. 

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Partners

The City of Melbourne has teamed with private and public organisations to enhance this project.

Major partners: Lend LeasePlaces Victoria and the City of Melbourne.

Architects: Clare Design and Hayball 

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