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How your property is valued

Victorian Government legislation requires all properties in the City of Melbourne municipality and across Victoria to be valued every two years on a common date. The value of your property is used to calculate your rates, so it is important that your valuation is up to date and accurate.

This year's rates have been calculated using the property values assessed on 1 January 2014.

What information is used to value a property?
Objections to valuations 

What information is used to value a property?

A valuation is an assessment of the market value of a property, at a specific date and in accordance with relevant legislation and legal precedent.

Your property values are assessed using information such as:

  • market sales and rents
  • property type and
  • property features.

Valuers build a profile of value levels for different locations and property types, guided by market sales and rental evidence.

The City of Melbourne collects market sale information each year and information about property rentals and expenses from owners and tenants. Under property sales law, councils must be notified of property sales.

The City of Melbourne also uses building and planning permits and other public documents to gather information about each property within the municipality. If further information is needed, an information request or a property inspection may also be necessary.

Valuers have powers to obtain additional information and will usually request this information by mail. However, a valuer can enter a property ‘at any reasonable time’ and may request any information that will help make ‘a true and correct valuation’. This may be done, for example, where an internal property inspection is needed to ensure an accurate valuation. Inspections are arranged with owner/occupiers. 

Objections to valuations

Rateable properties

If you disagree with the valuation (including the Australian Valuation Property Classification Code – AVPCC) of a rateable property you may lodge a written objection with Council within two months from the date of issue of the valuation and rate notice. An objection must state the grounds on which the objection is based and include contended values.

Please complete an objection form when lodging an objection. Objection forms are available here:

An objection proforma will ensure compliance with the Valuation of Land Act 1960 and enable Council to identify areas of contention.

Upon receipt of a formal objection, Council’s valuers will exchange property information. The objector will be invited to arrange a mutually convenient time to inspect the property and discuss relevant sales and rental evidence with the valuer.

If an adjustment to the valuation is warranted a Notice of Recommendation to adjust the Valuation will be forwarded to the Valuer General for audit and certification. If no adjustment is warranted, a Notice of Disallowance will be issued and no adjustment will be made.

If you are dissatisfied with the determination you have a further right of appeal to the Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal.

Formal objections to the valuation of a rateable property may be forwarded to City of Melbourne, GPO Box 2158, Melbourne 3001.

Non-rateable (exempt) properties

If you disagree with the valuation (including the Australian Valuation Property Classification Code – AVPCC)  you may lodge a written objection with the Valuer General within two months from the date of issue of the valuation and rate notice.  An objection must state the grounds on which the objection is based and include contended values.

Please contact the Valuer General – email valuer.general@dse.vic.gov.au or call 03 8636 2515 – for information about how to lodge an objection to non-rateable (exempt) properties.

Objections received after the notice date of issue

Objections received outside of two months of the issue date of the valuation and rate notice will not be considered.

An objection does not prevent the recovery of rates and charges

The lodging of an objection does not constitute grounds for non-payment of the Council rates and charges as assessed on the valuation and rate notice. You are required to pay by the dates outlined on the notice pending the outcome of any objection.



Buildings near water